Palm Thatched Wattle And Daub Hut

This is an old hut I built 2 years ago and have since demolished. It was a 2 m square floor with wattle and daub walls 1.5 m high topped with a pyramidal roof thatched with Alexander palm fronds. The building method is my usual plan- get a roof up first then build the walls. From start to finish it took 27 days (it could have been faster though- this was at a casual speed). This was the first wattle and daub hut I built and is larger than the other one I built later (my idea for now is to build small but well although I’ll try larger huts again in future).

The roof lasted for a few months before becoming rotten and bug eaten. As an important note the species of palm used in thatching makes all the difference. Had this hut been built in the mountain with wait-a-while palm fronds it would have lasted 2 years at least. Instead it was thatched with alexander palm fronds that deteriorated quickly.

I wasn’t to know this and was trying to adapt hut building practice I learned in the mountain to low land conditions (I’ve built similar huts up the mountain with the same roof shape that have lasted a long time). I hope in future videos to explore better roofing options to use in areas like this.

Also of interest in the video is another pot I make showing more detail than previous videos. The fire place for the hut is a simple pit in the center of the floor. It is a good hut design though it requires a simple ladder to construct.

82 thoughts on “Palm Thatched Wattle And Daub Hut

  1. Awesome work, dude.

    I’m Youtube subscriber and after seeing the “Building a Wattle and Daub Hut” video, I was like “fu%*, this is something I would like to try”.

    Thanks for the inspiration.

    Liked by 2 people

      • Did you make your daub from just mud? If you were to build a wattle and daub to live in and spend some real time making for your personal comfort, what daub recipe would you use. I’m looking into building one of these structures and I’m trying to get as much info as possible. I wish to maintain and live in this structure for quite a while. I have plenty of questions and your video was my inspiration to create a wattle and daub. If you could contact me at hanksc93@gmail.com with as much info as you can about this structure it would be greatly appreciated. I understand if your time is limited but if you can answer whether or not it is acceptable to start building this during the winter and the first question about the daub recipe that would be great!

        Kindest regards,
        CMH

        Like

      • It’s just mud. Ideally you should mix in straw or other fibrous material- even manure or hair was used in the past.. This gives it tensile strength and stops cracking. I have no problems with the walls cracking though. Make a small section fist and see how it dries as an experiment. Good luck.

        Like

  2. great work!🙂
    I have a question.
    how do you deal with bug bitings?
    You’re upper body is not wearing any clothes but I don’t think you’re having trouble with bugs like mosquittos
    do you have your own way to prevent it?

    Like

  3. hello!!!
    you’s video very good!o(≧∇≦o)i like!!!
    i hope you’s video can Continue to update!
    ❀.(*´▽`*)❀.You let me see the real rainforest
    in china,rainforest are scarce(。•́︿•̀。)
    I will always support youฅ( ̳• ◡ • ̳)ฅ
    at last,i want say my english is so bad,,,
    i hope you do not mind (ノへ ̄、) english is different

    i love youヽ(*≧ω≦)ノ

    Like

  4. Thanks for all these wonderful videos! They are a great inspiration.
    How do you carry all the wood that you need (for construction and fire)? Hand picked or are you using a primitive wagon? Thanks.

    Like

  5. What coloring/texture are you looking for to determine what is clay base and what is soil? And what are good “rule of thumb” places to look for clay deposits?

    Like

    • I look in creek banks for clay but have used clay straight from the ground and even once from where wild pigs wallowed and have made good pots.. Clay can be red yellow or even white in color. The texture is plastic in nature- good clay sticks together well if it falls apart it’s probably just mud. Also experiment with wetting the clay too different amounts until the clay reaches the right stiffness to be used. Some times finding good clay is just luck- I’ve tried to make clay from other sources and the pot’s just crack. Hope this helps.

      Like

  6. Superb videos and blog, you have excellent practical and primitive knowledge. I really like the work you do🙂.
    I’ve added you on my blog under the “Other Interesting Blogs” category.

    ~ Jon, New England Bushcraft

    Like

    • Hi Tristen. Yes your comments are working. I’m not sure if I will hold classes though a lot of people have asked. I was originally thinking of writing a book to sell through the you tube videos but even that will take a while seeing I’m still working on acquiring more skills. Thanks for subscribing- I remember you subscribed before the video was popular and I appreciate it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Olá!!!
    Estarei seguindo você aqui do Brasil, tenho poucas habilidades em fazer artes no mato, mas estou me aperfeiçoando vendo seus videos e vou tentar ser um bom aprendiz com você. Estarei sempre acessando os seus videos e ficarei feliz se você postar mais videos novos!!! estou aprendendo muitas coisas com você, obrigado por compartilhar seus ensinamento!!

    Like

  8. Hello.
    You are starting to get very popular.
    As you have several millions of view on your youtube, this could land you a deal with youtube to start making some money.
    People on the internet, specifically the website Reddit are huge fans of you. This is not something im just saying. I’ve seen loads of requests for more videos and really hope you start making more videos now that you are seeing some popularity.
    Every stoner on a section on reddit called /r/trees love you.
    Your videos are so peaceful and nice to watch.

    Some ideas for your videos:
    The first video you made was truly the best. I hope you can make more of those (maybe with a door?)
    Trapping and domesticating animals? Update on domesticating on the bees?
    Animal traps?
    Making food?
    Hunting?

    Good luck man, ur awesome !

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hi, first I would like to say thank you for introducing a new hobby, I’ve been fascinated with building things from scratch and I’ll most certainly attempt to create a sturdy adze.

    I have a question regarding construction areas, do you build in an isolated area, or near the public? And have you ever been told to not build here or there?

    Me and my brother delight watching your videos and are hoping you produce more creations.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Hi.
    Just curious — are windows not advisable for these structures? I’m just asking because they seem a bit claustrophobic, especially the dome hut… :]
    Anyway, good job and keep the videos coming. I enjoy them a lot.

    Like

    • Yeah, that’s a good point. Light is an important aspect of architecture. Windows let in air and the light kills some molds. If I need light I usually sit by the entrance. I might include them in future though.

      Like

  11. Hey man. I just wanted to say that I love your videos and I’ve watched them all several times. My only regret is not finding them sooner.
    I’ve always been a lover of survival and roughing it. The idea of living off of what you grow and hunt has always amazed me.
    I look forward to many more.
    Would you consider explaining what you’re doing as you do it? Speaking if possible?
    Although your silence adds something to it as well. The idea of being alone.
    And in the video where you made pot, you crumbled something up into the clay. What was it and why?

    Thank you for what you do. You’re an inspiration to many.

    Like

    • Thanks for the comment Cameron. I began not speaking because I couldn’t narrate but now people like that I don’t speak and foreigners don’t need to translate from English- It’s pure demonstration and mostly self explanatory. I’ll write details in the description for non- obvious things. I added crushed dry leaves to the clay to act as temper- it gives the pot tensile strength while it dries, preventing cracks from forming. Thanks.

      Like

      • I see. That makes sense.
        Thank you for responding so quickly.
        My wife and I are planning a few projects based off your work. We have some land that should do nicely.
        Do you have any other means of communication? Facebook perhaps?

        Like

      • Not yet Cameron. However if you have any questions feel free to ask. Also glad to hear you’re going to build some huts. Are you starting from scratch or using modern tools? Maybe you could film it and post on YT. Thanks.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Thank you again for taking an interest in your followers. It’s very appreciated.
    I do have a SOG machete and hatchet I could use to expedite things, But I think it’s fun and important to start from scratch. I have blacksmithing knowledge but I doubt I’ll find suitable material for that. Lol
    I believe I will use stone tools as you did. I’m in the foothills of North Carolina so wood and clay are bountiful. I’m toying with ideas. I would love to video our project and have your opinion on it. Is there anything in particular that you would like to see us tackle? I’m open to any suggestions. I am looking forward to your next video.

    Liked by 1 person

    • If wood and clay are your main resources why not make and fire bricks. Stack the un-fired bricks and coat them with mud forming a clamp kiln and fire the lot in one go without a kiln. That would be impressive. Let me know what ever video you put up- it would be interesting to see this done in other areas of the world. Thanks.

      Like

  13. I am a fan from China. I’ve watched all of your videos and it brings me not just illustration but a whole new lifestyle. First time that I realized that these primitive things do interest me.Thank u so much for your share. Love u!

    Like

  14. First i would like to say thank your for documenting your projects and sharing them with the world!

    I first came across your videos on facebook, but i could not trace it back to your youtube channel, these people stealing your work had millions of views, and they were being complete a-holes and not linking the original maker. I’m so glad i found you though. And you deserve to be compinsated.

    Your work is very inspiring! And i hope to find joy and pleasure in a hobby like you do yours.

    Best of luck to you, and dont get eaten by anything! Stay safe!😀

    P.S. If you are ever interested in some company, e-mail me and i will fly down.

    Like

    • Thanks Lucas. The free booted videos have cheated me of $1000’s. Face Book is really slow in taking down copyrighted videos and knows what it is doing is illegal and makes money off our videos instead. This creates a disincentive for all YouTube creators and is probably why most people only upload cat videos instead of good content. However I will watermark new videos to direct traffic back here and am glad you visited my site. Working on a big video now and hope to upload soon. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. This video is boss! I saw it on Facebook but then via the power of Google I found you on YouTube and here. Awesome videos! You would completely own the show Naked and Afraid!

    Like

  16. Thanks for the videos, very informative. How do the walls and external chimney go with wet weather? Do they deteriorate or hold up? Thanks again.

    Like

  17. Hi Sir,

    – You have The video’s name: Inovasi Petani Indonesia Kreatif : Building a primitive wattle and daub hut from scratch
    – It’s copied by another one and upload again on Youtube. This acction is Copyright Infringement ! This is video’s link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luiRMcinB9w
    – Let’s You complaint Copyright to Youtube.

    I hope my infomation is helpful.
    Thank for reading !

    Like

  18. thank you producing videos that allow people to be resourceful and intelligent. Not like TV were every episode is a disaster. Shame on them, and congrats to you.

    Like

  19. Reminds me of the Native Seminole Indian Chickee huts here in Florida. The roof frame is the same but thatched with Cabbage or Sabal Palm fronds. They leave the sides open with no walls in Spring/Summer and a fire in the middle so the smoke and wind drive off the mosquitoes. Of course they use other natural measures also for dealing with skeeters such as animal, fish, and plant oil; smelly odorous plants, mud, and so on. They put up temporary walls in the Fall/Winter to block the cold wind but take them down again in the Spring/Summer. They often hang hammocks or put in raised bed platforms like you showed. Another good demonstration.

    Like

  20. First off thanks for the videos it has helped me rethink some problems i have run into with pot and tool making. I have made many shelters but just quick bushcraft/survival shelters. I was wondering how long do you think it would take one to make the daub hut using modern tools? Ii would like to build one before my groups next meet and then all of us build a hut the way you have using primative tech.

    Like

    • It’s hard to say. Modern tools would be a bucket and a machete. Maybe 3 days. maybe one if you planned it perfectly and new where all the materials were. Notice that the huts I build are small (2 X 2 m and 2 m tall). 2 m is the height I can easily reach and is different for others. Make it to a height that suits you- but keep it small so it’s not to much work. Thanks.

      Like

  21. Very interesting videos! I lived in Africa 25 years ago and some of your work reminded me about the way people were building there (specifically the Somali refugees).

    Keep up the good work! I will for sure follow your blog and you tube channel. Greetings Björn

    Like

  22. GREAT JOB on these videos. I absolutely LOVE IT. Makes me want to run out in my back yard and make one. Keep up the great work. Very impressive. I have subscribed to your YouTube and look forward to seeing more videos.

    Like

  23. As someone interested in doing this for himself, where would you recommend I start my research for viable/best resources nearby? I live in Sweden so the vegetation here is much different than where you are. Thanks!

    Like

    • Probably start with the sas book. Make a list of projects you want to accomplish and make them realistic enough to do. Example 1. Firesticks, 2. Stone hand axe 3. Tipi shelter. 4. Bow and arrow. etc. Research basic information on the internet then go out and try it. Also learn what prehistoric people in Sweden built and copy from them. Good luck with your projects.

      Like

  24. Hey mate, loving all the vids. I like to camp in a minimalist fashion alot and make all sorts of huts and shelters it’s but always been with a survival knife.
    Your videos have really inspired me to go back to our roots and do things as we would many years ago and so il be trying that from now on.

    Just a few questions…

    1. Firstly, could you recomend any sources or books on garthering information about how to learn these things?

    2. Ive seen alot of vids on flint napping/ pressure flaking and seen you had been using similar techniques to build axes/adzes, were you specifically using flint rock? If not then are you worried about the type of rock or can these shaping techniques be done with most types

    3. If it were to rain to a point the mud in these huts took on water, would it be detrimental to the foundations and essentially collapse walls?

    Thanks again and keep the vids up!

    Like

    • 1. I just read widely on books and internet but have no one great source. Probably the sas book and Australian bush craft books. I normally think of a subject and look on the internet for it. A lot of the things I do aren’t written any where so I make these videos for it (I want to write a book one day).2. My stone is mainly basalt as we have no flint in this area. I just use rocks that seem strong enough to take a hit. It’s best to experiment with rocks in your area and get an idea of what is best. 3. The mud walls must be protected by the roof that juts out slightly to keep rain off it. In the tile hut you see that I used stone foundations for the wall to stop rising damp from affecting the mud walls-significantly improving their longevity. Thanks.

      Like

  25. Late to learn about you but great inspirational work, including the fact you can grow a large audience just by doing what you love and not spending show much time in the Internet side of things but making videos people want to watch.

    Thank You

    Like

  26. I really like what you have done. With all the many (I don’t know how many, but lots, probably) people that come to your website, and that watch your YouTube videos, I noticed you only have 705 followers. Perhaps this is because you have no obvious “follow” button? Once I decided I would follow you, it took me a couple minutes to find the button, even actively searching for it. Maybe you should consider adding a more prominent button at the top? I admire the fact that there are no AdSense advertisements about, most bloggers are in it for the fame and that money which can be made, and I admire how you just do it for fun.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s